Mentoring in Community

How to become a connecting ligament in your group

Max is a wonderful Christian who was serving his Lord at the highest levels when we first met. I noticed he walked with a limp. When he wanted to stand up and talk to me, he would always lean against a wall or hold my arm. Tactfully I said, "Max, what's the problem with your leg?" He replied, "Ralph, some years ago a disease attacked my leg and destroyed the ligaments around the ankle. The bones are fine, but all support for my ankle bones is gone. The ligaments don't give me any support. I used to love to run; now I can only limp."

In your cell group, is there a "Max" who limps because a "supporting ligament" has never been provided? Perhaps you are reading this sentence and thinking, I am like that. I limp along in my Christian life today because no one took the time to support me when I first became a believer. If so, you are learning why it is so important to be a ligament in your cell group.

There are two problems when ligaments do not function properly. The first is that a bone is not supported; the second is that the ligament itself is weak, diseased, and useless. I always use a special word for ligaments in this context. I call them mentors. A mentor is one who binds himself to answer for another—one who is responsible for another's default.

Mentoring Is Your First Ministry in a Cell Group

A newborn baby is totally consumed with his own needs. He cries when he is wet and when he is hungry. He offers no support to anyone in the family. This is one of the characteristics of being a child.

I recall when my first grandchild was born. Nathan kept his parents hopping to meet his needs. A couple of years later, baby Ruth entered the home. Immediately Nathan wanted to ...

article Preview

This article is currently available to SmallGroups.com subscribers only. To continue reading:

free newsletter

Sign up for our free Small Groups Newsletter : Regular access to innovative training resources, Bible-based curriculum, and practical articles.

Related

Develop Real Relationships
Develop Real Relationships
Intentionally build the relationships in your group.
Emphasize Relationships in Your Group
Emphasize Relationships in Your Group
How to set the stage for real friendships
Model Authentic Sharing
Model Authentic Sharing
A practical way to help your group members open up.
What You Should Not Share with Your Small Group
What You Should Not Share with Your Small Group
Three things you should keep to yourself
Healthy Boundaries for Small Groups
Healthy Boundaries for Small Groups
How to set healthy boundaries with group members
Helping Group Members Become Great Listeners
Helping Group Members Become Great Listeners
Teaching a critical relationship skill