Five Essentials For Small Group Health

How to keep your groups growing vibrantly.

Churches all over the nation are recognizing a need to get small groups going in their congregations. As people sense a desire for deeper relationships within the body of Christ, interest in the movement is rising. But getting small groups started in a church and keeping the groups healthy are two completely different jobs.

As head of Touch Outreach Ministry, my job is to look at churches that have failed with small groups and to try to help them find health. As I've done that, I've seen several principles of health emerge:

  1. Relationships must be a priority. Holistic small groups can only work when relationships between group members are considered number one. And that means having regular contact outside of meetings. I've experienced a vast majority of the transformation in my life through a small group experience, and it happened because of this principle. The groups have been very intimate friends of mine with whom I can share transparently. They've loved me unconditionally, and we've been able to show Christ to one another. I didn't view it as an opt-in thing. Without it, it would be like not having enough air to breath. They've been that valuable.
  2. Leaders need adequate training. Jesus is the best example of this. He discipled his people. He spent a lot of time with them, and out of relationship they started mimicking him, doing things the way he did them. Lots of leaders were produced this way, and they did great things—like planting churches and going to the uttermost parts of the world.

    Many churches get the process backwards. They want to give people a title and then train them. Jesus never did that. He spent three and a half years training and developing. Then he said, "You are my disciples." I think this is the way we ought to do it. We need to get people to serve in ministry and affirm them as we see their gifts. Then we can say "You're really good at this. Do you realize that? Wouldn't you like to be a leader?"

    Another reason adequate training is so important is that it gives you the opportunity to get to know the character of potential leaders. One of my biggest fears is promoting people to small group leadership too quickly. Sometimes when churches are desperate for leaders, they'll fast-track people into leadership without really knowing their character. Then a year later they find out the person's marriage is on the rocks or they're addicted to pornography or something like that. Had they gotten to know these people and their personal problems, then they could've said, "Your house isn't in order. We're not going to give you leadership elsewhere."

article Preview

This article is currently available to SmallGroups.com subscribers only. To continue reading:

Related

Three Reasons You Need a Small Group, Too
Three Reasons You Need a Small Group, Too
Small-group ministry leaders can’t just talk about life in small groups—we need to be experiencing it ourselves.
Embracing the Unsatisfied Life
Embracing the Unsatisfied Life
Building sustainable faith in your small group
Soul Care for Leaders
Soul Care for Leaders
Everything you need to encourage healthy leadership in your ministry
9 Ways to Help Group Members Take Ownership of Problems
9 Ways to Help Group Members Take Ownership of Problems
The struggle is real—and we have to own it if we want to change.
Us Is the New Me
Us Is the New Me
Experiencing personal growth collectively.
How Is the Bible Changing You?
How Is the Bible Changing You?
Assess how you've grown after completing a Bible study.