Drawing Your Fears

Here's a great introduction to the emotion of fear and our call to fear God.

Purpose: To help people start thinking about the topic of fear.

Activity: Give each group member a blank sheet of paper and a few crayons or colored pencils. Ask them to spend 5 minutes or so drawing a picture that symbolizes one of their biggest fears as a child. This could be something specific (like a particular monster) or it could be something more abstract (like the thought of parents divorcing).

After the time is up, ask for volunteers to share their drawings and explain what they represent. Allow anyone who wants to share time to do so, but don't force anyone who is unwilling to volunteer.

Possible follow-up questions:

  • Were there any similarities between our childhood fears—any themes or common elements that popped up repeatedly?
  • What comes to your mind when you think of fearing God? Where did you get that idea?
  • How is the fear of God different than the fear represented by our drawings? What are some of the problems that occur when we talk about fearing God?

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