Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

The darkest movie yet in this controversial children’s series.

Overview

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is the third film in a projected seven-part series about an orphaned wizard who attends a school for children who can work magic. Harry Potter was just a baby when his parents were killed by the Dark Lord Voldemort, and in this story, for the first time, Harry comes into contact with a few of his parents' closest friends—including the one who betrayed them to Voldemort.

This study guide will help you discuss the deeper themes of the movie. What does this film say about the relationships between magic and science, prophecy and free will, authority and rebellion, anger and mercy, and darkness and light?

Discussion Guide

• Movie Summary

• Discussing the Scenes

—Magic and Science
(Numbers 21:4-9; Deuteronomy 18:9-13; 2 Kings 18:4; Acts 8:9-24; 19:11-20)

—The Future and Free Will
(Deuteronomy 18:17-22; 1 Samuel 23:9-13; 28:3-20; 1 Chronicles 10:13-14)

—Authority and Rebellion
(1 Samuel 15:22-23; Mark 2:23-27; Romans 13:1-7; 2 Corinthians 12:14-15; Ephesians 6:1-9)

—Anger and Mercy
(Proverbs 14:16-17; Luke 6:27-42; John 8:1-11; James 1:19-20)

—Darkness and Light
(Matthew 5:14-16; John 1:1-9; Romans 13:12-14; Ephesians 5:8-14; 1 Thessalonians 5:4-8)

• As the Credits Roll

Based On

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (Warner Brothers, 2004), directed by Alfonso Cuaron; based on J.K. Rowlings's novel, screenplay written by Steven Kloves; rated PG.

Photo © Copyright Warner Brothers

Total number of pages

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