The Worn-Out Leader

For some reason, many leaders feel that in order to be the leader, they must do and be responsible for everything.

Darryl is worn out. Leading his group keeps him busy constantly, and that's on top of his family and job. And forget about recreation! Each week he plans the meeting: icebreaker, Bible study, worship, and prayer time; he makes plans for the group to do service projects together because several members have said they wanted to do that; and he lines up child care, social activities, and just about everything else for the group. He's been doing this since the group began a couple years ago (it seems like 10 to Darryl!).

What should Darryl do?

It sounds as if Darryl needs to get a grip on his group or he'll be toast! This is a pitfall of many group leaders—the "I need to do everything and be everything" syndrome. (It's also known as the "Messiah Complex!") For some reason, many leaders feel that in order to be the leader, they must do and be responsible for everything. There are two problems with this mind-set.

First, few people can maintain the type of schedule Darryl is facing. Like Darryl, for most of us, our jobs and families are each full-time jobs. Few can add another full time job on top of that, and God doesn't intend for us to do so. That's why he gave us the Body of Christ—so that ministry can be differentiated according to who is best equipped to do it. The doctrine of the body and of spiritual gifts is for every group of more than one person doing anything in the kingdom. This concept does more than distribute functions based on giftedness. It also distributes the workload and assures that each person has an equal opportunity to share in ministry.

Second, Darryl needs to remember the concept of group ownership. In my book, Small Group Bible Studies: How to Lead Them, I tell the story of learning about ...

article Preview

This article is currently available to SmallGroups.com subscribers only. To continue reading:

Related

Bring Structure to Your Ministry
Bring Structure to Your Ministry
Everything you need for the behind-the-scenes work of small-group ministry
Small-Group Ministry Metrics
Small-Group Ministry Metrics
Measure what matters.
Should We Structure for Rapid or Controlled Growth?
Should We Structure for Rapid or Controlled Growth?
Both models can bring incredible growth—if you choose the right one for your church.
How Should We Connect People into Small Groups?
How Should We Connect People into Small Groups?
Three connection methods that could work in your church.
8 Tips to Improve Communication Between Pastors and Small-Group Directors
8 Tips to Improve Communication Between Pastors and Small-Group Directors
It takes effort on both sides of the relationship.
Build a Small-Group Ministry Team
Build a Small-Group Ministry Team
Figure out what you need and recruit the right people.